NCAR/UCAR/UOP

Atmospheric Research - NCAR & UCAR
photo Home Our Organization Our Research News Center Education Community Tools Libraries
   

Webcasts and Multimedia Offerings - Weather, Climate & Society



Planning for Seven Generations Conference: Indigenous & Scientific Approaches to Climate Change

     
Casey Thornbrugh (University of Arizona and Tohono O'odham Community College) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Bull Bennett and Casey Thornbrugh
(42 minutes)
Talk 1 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Bennet describes 21st century Indians as grounded in their own culture and able to integrate that with modern technology. Speaking from Arizona, Thornbrugh reviews the cultural background, mentoring, and education that have shaped him. In his life and teaching he tries to bring together his scientific training and the American Indian experience and culture. | Conference Website
Bret Harper (Black and Veatch) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Bret Harper
(32 minutes)
Talk 2 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Harper, a former SOARS protégé, describes his research into ENSO's influence on the production of wind energy. He also discusses the state of the West Coast salmon fishery and his participation in a California tribal ecological knowledge program. The program's goal is restoration of tribal lands and of the tribe itself.
Sherri Heck (University of Colorado) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Sherri Heck
(17 minutes)
Talk 3 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. A gap in CO2 measurements in the southwestern U.S. and the possibility of educational collaboration motivated a study designed to measure CO2 fluxes. Heck reviews the hurdles she needed to overcome in setting up the project and the lessons she learned in the process.
Eron Brennan, UCAR Sherry Heck (University of Colorado)Casey Thornbrugh (University of Arizona and Tohono O'odham Community College)Bret Harper (Black and Veatch) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on the Perspective of the Next Generation
(35 minutes)
Talk 4 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Eron Brennan speaks as one student to another on the issues underlying climate change and other global problems. Heck elaborates on initial data from her CO2 research and the involvement of Navaho students in the project. Panelists describe the benefits of attending the conference and ways of introducing students to both traditional and indigenous science. They discuss the conflict between being an indigenous person and being a scientist and how we might all collaborate on climate change.
Oscar Kawagly (University of Alaska) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - Oscar Kawagly
(27 minutes)
Talk 5 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Roberto Gonzalez-Plaza introduces the Indigenous Educational Institute and Kawagly. Kawagly says some technology may become outdated as critical materials are used up; some technology is being blocked from adoption. His grandmother told him never to forget his language or his heritage. Eco-literacy is part of this spiritual and linguistic heritage and needs to be encouraged.
James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - James Rattling-Leaf
(8 minutes)
Talk 6 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Rattling-Leaf works at a tribal college at the intersection of culture and science. His concerns include research, communication among indigenous peoples, education, and bringing youth back to the land.
Denise Stephenson-Hawk (SERE), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - Denise Stephenson Hawk
(13 minutes)
Talk 7 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Less than 5% of Ph.D.s in the atmospheric sciences are awarded to people of diverse backgrounds. Institutions and educators do not understand unfamiliar cultures and do not provide the necessary environment for success. Stephenson Hawk argues that this must change because it will take all people on the planet working together to deal with climate change.
Daniel Wildcat (Haskell Indian Nations University),Oscar Kawagly (University of Alaska),James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Shared Approaches to Research and Education
(26 minutes)
Talk 8 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Wildcat talks about the need for communication among groups with different world views. He emhasizes four points: Hold next year's conference at a tribal college, use the archive of this conference to build a curriculum for indigenous students, work with the whole person, and get involved in designing the research. Participants suggest applying for grants to initiate collaboration, having NCAR scientists visit tribal lands to build scientific collaborations, and getting indigenous people involved in the IPCC and national climate organizations. Kawagly and Rattling-Leaf describe programs that address the disconnect between native youths and their language and land.
Rajul Pandya (CBP) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Indigenous & Scientific Approaches to Climate Change - Welcome
(11 minutes)
Talk 1 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Martin Reinhardt of Colorado State University and the Tribal Education Departments National Assembly explains the symbolism of the eagle feather staff. Pandya discusses how indigenous people and scientists can work together to solve some of the problems of climate change. | Conference Website
Rick Anthes (UCAR) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: UCAR President's Welcome
(5 minutes)
Talk 2 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. An important part of UCAR's mission, according to Anthes, is reaching out to the broader community to promote healthy, secure, prosperous, and sustainable life for all people on Earth. Anthes illustrates the challenges facing society with images of the melting ice cap and Hurricane Katrina and concludes with a brief description of UCAR and its work.
Timothy Killeen (NCAR) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: NCAR President's Welcome
(17 minutes)
Talk 3 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. After a summary of NCAR's facilities and staffing, Killeen quotes the founding director of NCAR regarding the responsibility of science to serve humanity. NCAR's mission is to provide facilities for others to use as well as to study the Earth system. With Mount Kenya's disappearing glacier as am example, he highlights the role of science in predicting the challenges facing the Earth.
Billy Frank, Jr. (Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Opening Keynote
(49 minutes)
Talk 4 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Frank talks about managing salmon and other threatened species for 20 tribes in the Northwest U.S. Everyone's survival depends on acknowledeing the problem, working together, and developing the political will to take action.
Elisabeth Holland (ACD) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Keynote Speaker II
(98 minutes)
Talk 5 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Holland describes the history and methodology of the IPCC. The most recent report (2007) states that warming is unequivocal and that most of the warming of the past 50 years is due to increases in greenhouse gases. In the short term, more warming is inevitable. Longer-term warning will depend on choices made now. We can expect more weather extremes and rising sea levels. A lively question and answer session follows Holland's talk.
Leroy Little Bear (Blackfoot Confederacy) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Leroy Little Bear
(24 minutes)
Talk 6 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Daniel Wildcat introduces the panel members. Little Bear outlines the differences between the world view of native peoples and that of scientists. Native American Indians see the world as being in constant flux and based on energy waves. Everything is animate and everything is related. Learning comes through repetition and renewal. Western science has traditionally studied the material world in isolation; polarized thinking is typical. There is little regard for repetition in the education process. He concludes with his own observations of climate change.
Caspar Ammann (CGD) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Caspar Ammann
(25 minutes)
Talk 7 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. According to Ammann, paleoclimatology has some similarities with the world view of native peoples. Climate is a continuum in which everything is interconnected. Scientists look for discontinuities in that continuum and are finding them in the extremes of precipitation, glacier collapse, and sea-level rise. Climate models are now partners to data in the study of climate change and the perspective is moving from global to local.
Daniel Wildcat (Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas), Leroy Little Bear (Blackfoot Confederacy), Caspar Ammann (CGD), Craig Fleener (Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments), Shannon McNeeley (ISSE) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate
(38 minutes)
Talk 10 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Participants make comments and ask questions: How do we strike a balance between sharing indigenous knowledge and protecting ourselves' from exploitation? Why do native populations sometimes withhold their knowledge? What are some examples of climate change in everyday life? How do we decide which indigenous knowledge to incorporate? What is blocking adaptation to climate change?
Albert White Hat, Sr. (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Albert White Hat Sr.
(23 minutes)
Talk 11 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. White Hat talks about translating for the film Dances with Wolves and then tells a creation story, relating it to today's climate change situation. We are hurting the Earth and if we don't change, the Earth will cleanse itself. He explains the viewpoint of "All my relatives": that every thing and being in the world is an actual relation.
Patricia Romero Lankao (ISSE) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Patricia Romero Lankao
(16 minutes)
Talk 12 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Romero Lankao shares her thoughts on how indigenous communities can contribute to the debate on climate change, sustainability, and resilience. She uses the example of indigenous Mexican people whose agricultural system managed natural resources in a sustainable, diverse, and productive way until it was compromised by modernization. If we want to develop more resilient systems, we need to learn from indigenous people.
Merv Tano (International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Merv Tano
(10 minutes)
Talk 13 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Agile leaders and institutions have the ability to look forward and take advantage of opportunities and to protect themselves from dangers. There are very few people who live subsistence lifestyles today. Subsistence living is stressed by general population growth, but overpopulation is seldom discussed. Native people have to do more than participate in climate change research, they need to take control of it.
James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Albert White Hat, Sr. (Rosebud Sioux Tribe), Patricia Romero Lankao (ISSE), Merv Tano (International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change
(48 minutes)
Talk 14 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. A participant talks about getting businesses and governments involved in efforts to deal with climate change. Romero Lankao comments that environmental problems are political problems. White Hat talks about the hardships and deprivation of growing up on a reservation and the resulting anger. Forgiveness is needed if we want to work together. Little Bear responds to Tano's presentation, saying that native peoples should offer an alternative science because the Western way has failed. A participant notes that indigenous communities in general don't cause the climate problem and asks how much they can do about it. White Hat notes that the educational system does not teach about science issues. Tano asks about practical responses to climate change as it affects native peoples and responds to a participant by asking if working together is relevant. White Hat invites everyone to ask for a good spring season. The closing ceremony is led by White Hat.
back to top

 


The National Center for Atmospheric Research and UCAR Office of Programs are operated by UCAR under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation and other agencies. Opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these webcasts do not necessarily reflect the views of UCAR/NCAR/UOP or any of its sponsors.

 

This document can be found at
rss icon Subscribe to our News Feeds at www.ucar.edu/news/rss