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Webcasts and Multimedia Offerings - Weather, Climate & Society




     This site is in redevelopment and has not been updated since September 2009. Please visit the Multimedia Services site for a chronological list of the latest webcasts.     

Climate science, climate policy

     
Michael Oppenheimer (Princeton University) Sep. 18, 2009
Regional Climate Models: A Critical Adaptation Tool for Communities and Industry - Part 1: Introduction
(13 Minutes)
Part 1 of 4: The impacts of climate change and climate variability have become increasingly problematic worldwide. These can vary widely with location and ecosystem, affecting both public and private sectors, often in unforeseen ways. As policymakers at national, regional, state and local levels grapple with how to mitigate and adapt to a changing and variable climate, industries must also prepare for and adapt to environmental and weather exigencies. New techniques in climate modeling will enable stakeholders to better predict impacts and prepare for them in a cost-effective way. The purpose of this briefing was to explore the knowledge generated by advanced regional climate modeling, cutting-edge modeling techniques, and the implications for corporate decision makers and regional policymakers. In Part 1 Oppenheimer introduces the key points of the briefing.
Greg Holland (NCAR, ESSL) Sep. 18, 2009
Regional Climate Models: A Critical Adaptation Tool for Communities and Industry - Part 2: High Impact Climate and Weather Prediction Research in Support of Societal Needs
(10 minutes)
Part 2 of 4. Holland outlines current research at the regional climate level.
Cortis Cooper, Chevron Fellow, Chevron Energy Technology Co. Sep. 18, 2009
Regional Climate Models: A Critical Adaptation Tool for Communities and Industry - Part 3: Benefits of Regional Climate Modeling for the Offshore Oil Industry
(5 minutes)
Part 3 of 4. Cooper talks about the benefits of regional climate modeling for the offshore oil industry.
Sarah Cottrell, Energy and Environmental Policy Advisor, Office of New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson Sep. 18, 2009
Regional Climate Models: A Critical Adaptation Tool for Communities and Industry - Part 4: Climate Modeling: A State and Regional Policymaking Perspective
(10 minutes)
Part 4 of 4. Cottrell discusses climate modeling from a policymaking perspective.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Sep. 03, 2009
Thermosphere Visuals - Multimedia Gallery
(animation, video, and illustrations)
Even though emissions of carbon dioxide warm the lower atmosphere, they have the opposite effect on the upper atmosphere. The reason has to do with the difference in density. | News Release
Tom Wigley (NCAR, ESSL, CGD) Jun. 19, 2009
Symposium in Honor of Tom M. L. Wigley - Part 1
(4 hours, 23 minutes, click title to view .mov with QuickTime)
Morning session - Opening remarks (Ben Santer & Phil Jones; Eric Barron, NCAR; Rick Anthes, UCAR) | Contributions of a plasma physicist to carbonate geochemistry and paleoclimatology: the legacy of Tom Wigley (Niel Plummer, U.S. Geological Survey) | A secret history of the observed surface temperature record (Phil Jones, University of East Anglia) | When is enough, enough? Tom Wigley and the quantitative analysis of proxy climate records (Malcolm Hughes, University of Arizona) | Solar variability and climate change (Peter Foukal, Heliophysics, Inc.) | Sulfate aerosol effects on climate (Bob Charlson, University of Washington) | Volcanic effects on climate (Caspar Ammann, NCAR) | Geoengineering solutions (Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution & Stanford University) | View Real Player or VLC version | Agenda and presenters' slides (pdf)
Tom Wigley (NCAR, ESSL, CGD) Jun. 19, 2009
Symposium in Honor of Tom M. L. Wigley - Part 2
(4 hours, 39 minutes, click title to view .mov with QuickTime)
Afternoon session: Scientific adventures with Tom - Detecting human-induced climate change and the great MSU debate (Ben Santer, Lawrence Livermore National Lab) | Tom Wigley and the dawn of Earth System modeling (Dave Schimel, NCAR) | Obtaining sub-grid-scale information from coarse-resolution General Circulation Model output: "a classic" revisited? (Rob Wilby, Loughborough University) | Impacts of human-induced climate change (Jean Palutikof, Griffith University) | A changing climate for the Great Barrier Reef (Janice Lough, Australian Institute of Marine Science) | General issues in integrated assessment (Jae Edmonds, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) | Stabilization of climate: Can we meet the technological challenge? (Marty Hoffert, New York University) | Concluding remarks (Tom Wigley) | View Real Player or VLC version | Agenda and presenters' slides (pdf)
Eric Barron (NCAR) Jun. 15, 2009
Implications of Going "Beyond" Science
(44 minutes, click title to view .mov with QuickTime)
Baron proposes a deliberate approach to climate change that he calls environmental rationalism. Based on a solid observing system, this approach would aim to both mitigate and adapt to climate change in order to protect life, property, and the planet while promoting economic vitality. However, neither the philosophical underpinnings nor the Earth management sciences needed are in place. Barron outlines five steps he believes are essential in order to meet the challenge. An NSF Facilities User Workshop presentation. | View Real Player or VLC version | Presenter's slides
Guy Brasseur (NCAR, ESSL) Jun. 15, 2009
Earth System Observations and Modeling: The Challenges for Tomorrow
(63 minutes, click title to view .mov with QuickTime)
Current challenges include predicting climate change, understanding the Earth as a complex interactive system, and unifying diverse models, while new emphases, according to Brasseur, will be geoengineering, short-term climate prediction, and methodologies coupling the natural Earth system to the human system. He anticipates a shift from fundamental research to climate services. An NSF Facilities User Workshop presentation. | View Real Player or VLC version | Presenter's slides
Jack Fellows (UCAR), Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), Jonathon Overpeck, (University of Arizona), Cynthia Rosenzweig (NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies), Karen Hobbs (City of Chicago), Donald Wuebbles (University of Illinois) Apr. 01, 2009
A Briefing on Climate Adaptation Policy Issues
(74 minutes)
Panelists participating in this UCAR-sponsored briefing discuss how cities are planning to deal with climate change and how the federal government can help in that effort. New York City and Chicago are making progress in their mitigation and adaptation efforts. Other cities are struggling. Panelists advocate a national climate adaptation network so that planning efforts can be more integrated to avoid conflicts over water, land, and other resources. | Presenters' slides (PDF)
Roger A. Pielke Jr. (University of Colorado) Feb. 18, 2009
Some Uncomfortable Knowledge about Climate Change
(67 minutes)
Pielke discusses the politicization of climate science, which brings with it the pathologies of politics. Political "culture wars" are being waged through science. A few scientists have begun to speak out on this situation, but more leadership is required.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Jan. 29, 2009
HIAPER Pole to Pole Observations (HIPPO) - Multimedia Gallery
(teleconference, videos, photos)
HIPPO is a three-year field project to make the most extensive airborne sampling of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere to date, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Study results will help scientists understand the behavior of these gases in the atmosphere and lead to improved predictions about climate change. | News Release
Laura Pan(NCAR, ACD) Jan. 21, 2009
START08 - Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 Experiment: Scientific Concept and Initial Results
(42 minutes)
Using HIAPER, the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V research aircraft, the START08 field campaign focused on transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Pan discusses the experiment's concept and design process, highlights of the research flights, expected results, as well as various aspects of working on a research aircraft.
Erland Kallen (Stockholm University) Dec. 19, 2008
The Need for Wind Profile Measurements from Space: Assimilation of Wind Data from the ADM/Aeolus Mission
(47 minutes)
The Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (Aeolus) will provide line-of-sight wind profiles using a Doppler lidar measurement technique. Wind observations are particularly needed in tropical regions and in the midlatitudes. The latter area has implications for our understanding of the processes that govern Arctic warming and the retreat of Arctic sea ice. Additional objectives are aerosol information and cloud properties.
Jack Fellows (UCAR, UOP), Nancy Colleton (Alliance for Earth Observations), Bob Gagosian (Consortium for Ocean Leadership), Keith Seitter (American Meteorological Society), Veronica Johnson (WRC TV), Oct. 23, 2008
Actions to Make Our Nation More Resilient to Severe Weather and Climate Change
(92 minutes)
Panelists testify to the importance of investing in research related to severe weather and climate change. In order to adapt to these threats to economic and social stability, decision makers need local and regional scale information, but climate models are hampered by lack of research, observations, and computing at this scale. | Advice to the New Administration and Congress: Actions to Make our Nation Resilient to Severe Weather and Climate Change
Tom Wigley (NCAR), Jae Edmonds (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Maryland) Jul. 08, 2008
The Energy Challenge of Climate Change: More Urgent Than We Thought
(32 minutes)
In this congressional briefing Wigley notes that the amount of carbon-free energy required to stabilize CO2 concentrations has been built into no-climate-policy scenarios. These assumed changes may be unrealistic in the face of rapid development in Asia. According to Edmonds, stabilizing CO2 concentrations at 550 ppm will require new science and technology to reduce the cost of such an effort. | GTSP Report
David A. Randall (Colorado State University) May. 21, 2008
The Role of Moisture in the Madden-Julian Oscillation
(65 minutes)
Randall's group has been using a superparameterized version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) to study the Madden-Julian Oscillation. Comparing results to both observations and results from the conventional CAM, he presents an analysis of the processes that give rise to the MJO in the Super-CAM model.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Apr. 30, 2008
Weather Modification - Multimedia Gallery
(illustrations and videos)
Commercial operators, governments, and academic researchers worldwide are engaging in cloud seeding and other weather modification projects to try to influence local conditions. NCAR scientists and their colleagues are investigating efforts to build up wintertime snowpack in the western United States and bring more rain to drought-stricken regions around the world. | Media Advisory
Casey Thornbrugh (University of Arizona and Tohono O'odham Community College) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Bull Bennett and Casey Thornbrugh
(42 minutes)
Talk 1 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Bennet describes 21st century Indians as grounded in their own culture and able to integrate that with modern technology. Speaking from Arizona, Thornbrugh reviews the cultural background, mentoring, and education that have shaped him. In his life and teaching he tries to bring together his scientific training and the American Indian experience and culture. | Conference Website
Bret Harper (Black and Veatch) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Bret Harper
(32 minutes)
Talk 2 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Harper, a former SOARS protégé, describes his research into ENSO's influence on the production of wind energy. He also discusses the state of the West Coast salmon fishery and his participation in a California tribal ecological knowledge program. The program's goal is restoration of tribal lands and of the tribe itself.
Sherri Heck (University of Colorado) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: The Perspective of the Next Generation - Sherri Heck
(17 minutes)
Talk 3 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. A gap in CO2 measurements in the southwestern U.S. and the possibility of educational collaboration motivated a study designed to measure CO2 fluxes. Heck reviews the hurdles she needed to overcome in setting up the project and the lessons she learned in the process.
Eron Brennan, UCAR Sherry Heck (University of Colorado)Casey Thornbrugh (University of Arizona and Tohono O'odham Community College)Bret Harper (Black and Veatch) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on the Perspective of the Next Generation
(35 minutes)
Talk 4 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Eron Brennan speaks as one student to another on the issues underlying climate change and other global problems. Heck elaborates on initial data from her CO2 research and the involvement of Navaho students in the project. Panelists describe the benefits of attending the conference and ways of introducing students to both traditional and indigenous science. They discuss the conflict between being an indigenous person and being a scientist and how we might all collaborate on climate change.
Oscar Kawagly (University of Alaska) Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - Oscar Kawagly
(27 minutes)
Talk 5 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Roberto Gonzalez-Plaza introduces the Indigenous Educational Institute and Kawagly. Kawagly says some technology may become outdated as critical materials are used up; some technology is being blocked from adoption. His grandmother told him never to forget his language or his heritage. Eco-literacy is part of this spiritual and linguistic heritage and needs to be encouraged.
James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - James Rattling-Leaf
(8 minutes)
Talk 6 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Rattling-Leaf works at a tribal college at the intersection of culture and science. His concerns include research, communication among indigenous peoples, education, and bringing youth back to the land.
Denise Stephenson-Hawk (SERE), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Shared Approaches to Research and Education - Denise Stephenson Hawk
(13 minutes)
Talk 7 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Less than 5% of Ph.D.s in the atmospheric sciences are awarded to people of diverse backgrounds. Institutions and educators do not understand unfamiliar cultures and do not provide the necessary environment for success. Stephenson Hawk argues that this must change because it will take all people on the planet working together to deal with climate change.
Daniel Wildcat (Haskell Indian Nations University),Oscar Kawagly (University of Alaska),James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Apr. 25, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Shared Approaches to Research and Education
(26 minutes)
Talk 8 of 8 on Day 2 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Wildcat talks about the need for communication among groups with different world views. He emhasizes four points: Hold next year's conference at a tribal college, use the archive of this conference to build a curriculum for indigenous students, work with the whole person, and get involved in designing the research. Participants suggest applying for grants to initiate collaboration, having NCAR scientists visit tribal lands to build scientific collaborations, and getting indigenous people involved in the IPCC and national climate organizations. Kawagly and Rattling-Leaf describe programs that address the disconnect between native youths and their language and land.
Bob Henson (UCAR Communications) Apr. 17, 2008
The Rough Guide to Climate Change
(26 minutes)
Henson recounts his experiences writing The Rough Guide to Climate Change. Working at night to meet deadlines, choosing the cover, and dealing with a British publisher led to some surprising and amusing experiences.
Rajul Pandya (CBP) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Indigenous & Scientific Approaches to Climate Change - Welcome
(11 minutes)
Talk 1 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Martin Reinhardt of Colorado State University and the Tribal Education Departments National Assembly explains the symbolism of the eagle feather staff. Pandya discusses how indigenous people and scientists can work together to solve some of the problems of climate change. | Conference Website
Rick Anthes (UCAR) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: UCAR President's Welcome
(5 minutes)
Talk 2 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. An important part of UCAR's mission, according to Anthes, is reaching out to the broader community to promote healthy, secure, prosperous, and sustainable life for all people on Earth. Anthes illustrates the challenges facing society with images of the melting ice cap and Hurricane Katrina and concludes with a brief description of UCAR and its work.
Timothy Killeen (NCAR) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: NCAR President's Welcome
(17 minutes)
Talk 3 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. After a summary of NCAR's facilities and staffing, Killeen quotes the founding director of NCAR regarding the responsibility of science to serve humanity. NCAR's mission is to provide facilities for others to use as well as to study the Earth system. With Mount Kenya's disappearing glacier as am example, he highlights the role of science in predicting the challenges facing the Earth.
Billy Frank, Jr. (Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Opening Keynote
(49 minutes)
Talk 4 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Frank talks about managing salmon and other threatened species for 20 tribes in the Northwest U.S. Everyone's survival depends on acknowledeing the problem, working together, and developing the political will to take action.
Elisabeth Holland (ACD) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Keynote Speaker II
(98 minutes)
Talk 5 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Holland describes the history and methodology of the IPCC. The most recent report (2007) states that warming is unequivocal and that most of the warming of the past 50 years is due to increases in greenhouse gases. In the short term, more warming is inevitable. Longer-term warning will depend on choices made now. We can expect more weather extremes and rising sea levels. A lively question and answer session follows Holland's talk.
Leroy Little Bear (Blackfoot Confederacy) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Leroy Little Bear
(24 minutes)
Talk 6 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Daniel Wildcat introduces the panel members. Little Bear outlines the differences between the world view of native peoples and that of scientists. Native American Indians see the world as being in constant flux and based on energy waves. Everything is animate and everything is related. Learning comes through repetition and renewal. Western science has traditionally studied the material world in isolation; polarized thinking is typical. There is little regard for repetition in the education process. He concludes with his own observations of climate change.
Caspar Ammann (CGD) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Caspar Ammann
(25 minutes)
Talk 7 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. According to Ammann, paleoclimatology has some similarities with the world view of native peoples. Climate is a continuum in which everything is interconnected. Scientists look for discontinuities in that continuum and are finding them in the extremes of precipitation, glacier collapse, and sea-level rise. Climate models are now partners to data in the study of climate change and the perspective is moving from global to local.
Craig Fleener (Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Craig Fleener
(18 minutes)
Talk 8 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Fleener describes the beauty of his home in Ft. Yukon, above the Arctic Circle. People living in nature experience climate change directly. Indigenous knowledge is like scientific knowledge in that it is based on centuries of research. Native peoples need to be allowed to adapt to current and future climate change. For example, dates for hunting seasons need to be flexible, responding to change. Indigenous knowledge needs to be incorporated into scientific knowledge. The native community must involve itself in this process by creating partnerships and mentoring young people.
Shannon McNeeley (ISSE) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate - Shannon McNeeley
(21 minutes)
Talk 9 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. McNeeley works with native villages in Alaska, incorporating indigenous observations and ecological knowledge with Western science in a study of the climate vulnerabilities and adaptive capacity of these societies. Indigenous knowledge can enhance scientific studies by providing needed local information, by asking societally relevant questions of the data, and by finding nuances masked by conventional data analysis. Climate-caused changes create problems not only in hunting for food for the winter but also in preserving the meat. Changing hunting dates is difficult because numerous governmental agencies are involved.
Daniel Wildcat (Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas), Leroy Little Bear (Blackfoot Confederacy), Caspar Ammann (CGD), Craig Fleener (Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments), Shannon McNeeley (ISSE) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Observations and Projections of a Changing Climate
(38 minutes)
Talk 10 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Participants make comments and ask questions: How do we strike a balance between sharing indigenous knowledge and protecting ourselves' from exploitation? Why do native populations sometimes withhold their knowledge? What are some examples of climate change in everyday life? How do we decide which indigenous knowledge to incorporate? What is blocking adaptation to climate change?
Albert White Hat, Sr. (Rosebud Sioux Tribe) Apr. 09, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Albert White Hat Sr.
(23 minutes)
Talk 11 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. White Hat talks about translating for the film Dances with Wolves and then tells a creation story, relating it to today's climate change situation. We are hurting the Earth and if we don't change, the Earth will cleanse itself. He explains the viewpoint of "All my relatives": that every thing and being in the world is an actual relation.
Patricia Romero Lankao (ISSE) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Patricia Romero Lankao
(16 minutes)
Talk 12 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Romero Lankao shares her thoughts on how indigenous communities can contribute to the debate on climate change, sustainability, and resilience. She uses the example of indigenous Mexican people whose agricultural system managed natural resources in a sustainable, diverse, and productive way until it was compromised by modernization. If we want to develop more resilient systems, we need to learn from indigenous people.
Merv Tano (International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change - Merv Tano
(10 minutes)
Talk 13 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. Agile leaders and institutions have the ability to look forward and take advantage of opportunities and to protect themselves from dangers. There are very few people who live subsistence lifestyles today. Subsistence living is stressed by general population growth, but overpopulation is seldom discussed. Native people have to do more than participate in climate change research, they need to take control of it.
James Rattling Leaf (Sicangu Policy Institute at Sinte Gleska University), Albert White Hat, Sr. (Rosebud Sioux Tribe), Patricia Romero Lankao (ISSE), Merv Tano (International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management) Apr. 08, 2008
Planning for Seven Generations: Panel on Looking Forward: Agile Leadership in Times of Change
(48 minutes)
Talk 14 of 14 on Day 1 of the Planning for Seven Generations Conference. A participant talks about getting businesses and governments involved in efforts to deal with climate change. Romero Lankao comments that environmental problems are political problems. White Hat talks about the hardships and deprivation of growing up on a reservation and the resulting anger. Forgiveness is needed if we want to work together. Little Bear responds to Tano's presentation, saying that native peoples should offer an alternative science because the Western way has failed. A participant notes that indigenous communities in general don't cause the climate problem and asks how much they can do about it. White Hat notes that the educational system does not teach about science issues. Tano asks about practical responses to climate change as it affects native peoples and responds to a participant by asking if working together is relevant. White Hat invites everyone to ask for a good spring season. The closing ceremony is led by White Hat.
Andrew Light (University of Washington) Apr. 04, 2008
March of the Documentaries: Film and the Climate Change Debate
(97 minutes)
Focusing on Everything's Cool, Light discusses how film is shaping public opinion regarding climate change. He highlights the extent to which various filmmakers have dealt with the moral dimensions of climate change.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Feb. 07, 2008
Natural Ocean "Thermostat" May Protect Some Coral Reefs - Mutlimedia Gallery
(video, illustration)
Natural processes may prevent oceans from warming beyond a certain point, helping protect some coral reefs from the impacts of climate change, new research finds.
Tim Killeen (NCAR), Richard Anthes (UCAR) Oct. 18, 2007
NCAR Celebrates the 2007 Nobel Prize for Peace
(12 minutes)
The director of NCAR and president of UCAR celebrate award of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Peace to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Albert Gore. Forty NCAR authors participated in the 2007 IPCC assessment report, along with computational, technical, and administrative staff from across NCAR and UCAR. Additional current and past staff have made significant contributions to the three previous assessments over the past 20 years. | Abstract
Kevin Trenberth (CGD) Oct. 18, 2007
Global Warming: Coming Ready or Not!
(61 minutes)
Trenberth provides future prospects using climate models and the paleoclimate record. He introduces the international framework, including the IPCC, the UNFCCC, and the Kyoto Protocol, while emphasizing the need for consensus and political will, along with strengthened institutions and international governmental mechanisms.
Guy Brasseur (NCAR, ESSL) Oct. 18, 2007
The Story of Ozone in Our Atmosphere: A Success Story
(58 minutes)
Brasseur provides a historical perspective on the discovery of the chemical nature of this gas and its ability to protect the biosphere from harmful ultraviolet solar radiation. It took decades for scientists to understand how ozone is formed and how it is destroyed. Brasseur discusses the role of observations, laboratory studies, and modeling in successfully addressing the problem of the Antarctic ozone hole, which was created by the use of industrially manufactured chlorofluorocarbons. The efforts to reduce ozone depletion have also had a protective effect on the climate, making this is a story of success for both the scientific community and policymakers.
Barry Huebert (University of Hawaii) Oct. 16, 2007
The Ocean Uptake of CO2 is an Incredibly Loose Cannon! Measuring DMS Fluxes to Predict the Ocean Uptake of CO2
(53 minutes)
Huebert discusses the uncertainties of the future CO2 budget. Studies of paleo variability are of limited use in forecasting and existing models of transfer velocities are uncertain to at least a factor of two. Our ignorance of the quantitative controls on transfer velocities and the uncertainty of models contribute to the problem. Huebert outlines steps that could be taken. | Abstract
William H. Hooke (American Meteorological Society) Oct. 09, 2007
The 21st Century Outlook for Disasters - and How We Will Cope
(52 minutes)
Social trends, such as increased human population, rising per capita consumption of natural resources, and an accelerating pace of societal and technological advance appear to be on a collision course with our planet's workings. This has implications for both (1) the future of disasters themselves, and (2) the coping strategies available to us. | Abstract
Kevin Trenberth (CGD) Sep. 27, 2007
Global Warming - USINFO
(3 minutes)
Trenberth helps narrate an outreach video from the U.S. Department of State explaining the climate system and findings by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that the climate system is warming and human activities are the reason. | Abstract
Bert Holtslag (Wageningen University, The Netherlands) Sep. 25, 2007
Modeling Atmospheric Boundary Layers for Weather and Climate Studies
(42 minutes)
Holtslag addresses the problematic nature of modeling and prediction of the atmospheric boundary in studies of weather, climate, and air quality with an emphasis on conditions over land and ice. He presents results from a study of model intercomparisons organized within the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS) for single column models as compared to field observations and fine scale models. He also discusses results from the boundary-layer formulation of the Community Climate Model.
Peter Gleick (Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security), William Easterling (Pennsylvania State University), Rosina Bierbaum (University of Michigan) Sep. 24, 2007
Briefing: Climate Impacts and Adaptation in the United States: Lessons from Agriculture and Water Resources
(97 minutes)
New research in the United States and internationally highlights the need for policymakers to begin to look at combined efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while adapting to unavoidable impacts, particularly in the areas of water resources and agriculture. This briefing addresses what we know and need to know about these climate impacts for the United States and offers insights into what the federal government needs to consider in terms of resources and organization to ensure that national efforts meet the needs of decision makers.
Greg Holland (MMM) Aug. 15, 2007
Hurricanes and Global Warming: What's Hot and What's Not
(53 minutes)
How climate change has already influenced hurricanes and where the future may take us.
D. James Baker (Consultant, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO) Aug. 09, 2007
Risk, Wealth, and Communications - Climate Policy Implications
(25 minutes)
Talk 1 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Baker cites Washington's long history of scientific accomplishments. He then outlines the keys to getting people and governments to invest in reducing carbon emissions. First, people need to understand the risk and act on it. China is a critical player here. Second, business must see that that there are profits and new wealth to be made from carbon sequestration. Lastly, more effective mass communication must get the science and issues to the public.
Stephen H. Schneider (Stanford University) Aug. 09, 2007
Finding Warren: Any Fingerprints?
(26 minutes)
Talk 2 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Schneider humorously presents evidence of Washington's involvement in the development of climate science. He then turns to the difficulties of any carbon emission reduction program, such as that recently adopted by California. These include determining a baseline, measuring harm to various sectors, and assigning values to those affected. Climate models may be objective, but nothing about policy implementation is. The science of climate change is mostly settled, but great uncertainty remains when we look at human behavior and the climate system itself.
Neal Lane (Rice University) Aug. 09, 2007
A Model Scientist for Global Change
(33 minutes)
Talk 3 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Lane talks about global change from three perspectives: a flattening world, a warming world, and a dumbed-down world. Flattening refers to likely decreases in research funding and numbers of researchers in the United States and likely increases in the developing world. In discussing a warming and a dumbed-down world, he deplores both the lack of federal action in the face of climate change since 2001 and the forces weakening science and strengthening ideology. Lane discusses the important relationship between the National Science Foundation and the National Science Board and notes Washington's role as a model civic scientist in leading the board in difficult times.
Shirley Malcom (American Association for the Advancement of Science) Aug. 09, 2007
Playing the Game: Making the Rules
(25 minutes)
Talk 4 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Malcom pays tribute to Washington's contributions to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She discusses the underrepresentation of minorities in the sciences. The federal goverment acted quickly after Sputnik to encourage science education, but current efforts to encourage underrepresented groups are now portrayed as detrimental to other groups. The K-12 system is broken and needs a systemic solution. She concludes with the Katrina case as an illustration of the limits of science. It is politicians who must act on the recommendations of scientists.
Michael "Mickey" Glantz (CCB) Aug. 09, 2007
Oh What a Lovely Climate Change: A Quick Look at Environmental Injustices
(28 minutes)
Talk 5 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. After a humorous introduction, Glantz turns to global warming. He states that responses so far have been lacking in vision, focusing on short-term adaptation and mitigation rather than prevention. Some groups are trying to capitalize on global warming instead of taking action to prevent it. Climate change is not simply an environmental issue, it is also a public health, human rights, and economics issue, and there will be winners and losers. Sharing climate knowledge is empowering and essential in addressing climate injustice.
Warren M. Washington (CGD), Neal Lane (Rice University), Shirley Malcom (American Association for the Advancement of Science), Michael "Mickey" Glantz (CCB), Stephen H. Schneider (Stanford University), James Baker (Consultant, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, UNESCO) Aug. 09, 2007
Panel on the Policy Implications of Climate Change
(37 minutes)
Talk 6 of 7 on Day 2 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Discussion of the policy implications of climate change and the challenges confronting policymakers. How do public officials use, or ignore, scientific information? Are lessons actually learned from prior studies or disastrous events like Hurricane Katrina? Who carries the messages about climate change and climate impacts to the communities most affected?
Warren M. Washington (CGD) Aug. 09, 2007
Closing Remarks: The Warren Washington Symposium
(7 minutes)
After thanking the participants and organizers, Washington notes that one topic not covered at the symposium was insurance and the viability of humans living in high risk areas. The insurance industry will be a force in adaptation to climate change. Washington's group is looking into climate change scenarios based on varying levels of emissions, whereas the IPCC concentrated on scenarios where there wasn't much change for 30 to 40 years. This work, in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, can offer policymakers another set of strategies, based on whether certain actions are taken or not.
James Hurrell (CGD), Tim Killeen (NCAR), (Guy Brasseur (ESSL), Richard A. Anthes(UCAR) Aug. 08, 2007
Opening Remarks: The Warren Washington Symposium
(25 minutes)
Talk 1 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Hurrell notes that this is a scientific symposium intended to honor Washington's many contributions and to discuss the scientific opportunities associated with modeling, analysis, and science policy. Killeen emphasizes Washington's extraordinary role in mentoring young scientists and his pioneering work in climate modeling. Brasseur relates his long relationship with Washington in shaping NCAR and the development of climate modeling. Anthes humorously discusses Washington's nice and naughty sides.
Warren M. Washington (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
Warren Washington's Welcome
(9 minutes)
Talk 2 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Warren Washington welcomes the participants and recalls his early years at NCAR, including the building of the Mesa Lab. He expresses the hope that the United States will become a leader in addressing climate change and developing long-term solutions. He would like to see the symposium contribute to solutions and advance our understanding of climate change.
Akira Kasahara (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
Warren Washington's Unique Contributions for the Development of NCAR General Circulation Model (GCM)
(25 minutes)
Talk 3 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Kasahara discusses how the NCAR General Circulation Model developed. The design principle was community use with documentation and was based on the work of L.K. Richardson. Kasahara cites the contributions of Washington to the entire process of development.
John Kutzbach (University of Wisconsin) Aug. 08, 2007
Orbital Forcing of Monsoons: Climate Model Experiments from 1981-2007
(25 minutes)
Talk 4 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Kutzbach discusses the past 25 years of experimentation on the response of monsoons to changes in Earth's orbit using increasingly complex climate models and simulations of longer duration. The comparisons between these simulations and observations have helped evaluate the accuracy of climate models.
Bette Otto-Bliesner, (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
IPCC and Paleoclimate: Global Change Paleoclimatology
(25 minutes)
Talk 5 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Otto-Bliesner discusses the relevance of a paleoclimate perspective on global change. She reviews progress over the last 30 years, particularly in the use of quantitative analysis, and she outlines some of the outstanding issues: glacial-interglacial cycles, the last millennium, and the geological perspective.
Bette Otto-Bliesner (CGD), Akira Kasahara (CGD), John Kutzbach (University of Wisconsin), Warren M. Washington (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
Panel on the Evolution of Climate Modeling
(36 minutes)
Talk 6 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Discussion on the evolution of climate modeling.
Ari Patrinos (Synthetic Genomics Inc.) Aug. 08, 2007
Climate Change and Policy Implications
(32 minutes)
Talk 7 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Patrinos sees the United States on the threshold of significant action on climate change. A convergence of energy, security, and economic policies in the next federal administration may lead to a more proactive role in dealing with climate change. He stresses the importance of bioenergy and of international organizations in implementing solutions.
Kevin Trenberth (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
A Tribute to Warren Washington: Geoengineering
(22 minutes)
Talk 8 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Trenberth details his long association with Washington at NCAR and then discusses one possible solution for the problems of global warming: geoengineering. It has been suggested that we emulate the effects of volcanic eruptions in order to cut down on incoming solar radiation. Trenberth examines various model runs and concludes that this solution is not appropriate because it would result in a decline in land precipitation and discharge.
Gerald A. Meehl (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
Climate Change Modeling: Past, Present, Future
(22 minutes)
Talk 9 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Meehl traces the development of climate change modeling from the late 1970s to the present. The challenge in the future will be to use coupled climate models to quantify time-evolving regional climate changes to which human societies will have to adapt.
John Drake (Oak Ridge National Lab) Aug. 08, 2007
Tribute to Dr. Warren Washington: The Lure of Computation and Modeling
(15 minutes)
Talk 10 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Drake begins with the connection between increasing computational power and weather and climate modeling. He discusses the development of climate modeling and future directions including the challenge of predicting local effects of global warming on short- and long-range time scales.
David C. Bader (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) Aug. 08, 2007
The Intersection of Science, Computational Science, and Information Technology: The Warren Washington Legacy
(18 minutes)
Talk 11 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. After discussing the development of the Parallel Climate Model, Bader emphasizes today's need to integrate models and observations in order to improve predictive models. There needs to be an infrastructure for climate prediction that includes the rapid evaluation of new ideas, diagnostics, computing resources, and collaboratory technology.
Marshall Shepherd (University of Georgia) Aug. 08, 2007
Urban Effects of Climate: Can We Learn Anything about Climate Change from Urban Climate Studies and Modeling?
(20 minutes)
Talk 12 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Shepherd first describes how urban areas influence temperature, air quality, precipitation, and carbon exchange. Lessons from urban climate studies for the broader climate change community include human adaptation and mitigations strategies, the use of advanced coupled modeling to document the relationship between urbanization and larger climate change, and the necessity of an integrated and cross-disciplinary approach.
Greg Jenkins (Howard University) Aug. 08, 2007
Climate and Society: There Is Still More Work To Do
(22 minutes)
Talk 13 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Jenkins talks about Washington's influence on his own career and his outstanding leadership. Jenkins's scientific presentation focuses on climate change in West Africa, particularly regarding precipitation. He notes the large degree of uncertainty regarding changes in this area with one of the major problems being a lack of observations.
Warren M. Washington (CGD), Gerald A. Meehl (CGD), John Drake (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), David C. Bader (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison), Kevin Trenberth (CGD), Marshall Shepherd (University of Georgia), Greg Jenkins (Howard University) Aug. 08, 2007
Panel on Climate Analysis and Prediction of Future Climate
(45 minutes)
Talk 14 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Discussion on Climate Analysis and Prediction of Future Climate
Warren M. Washington (CGD) Aug. 08, 2007
Climate Modeling, Climate Change Prediction, and Science Policy
(47 minutes)
Talk 15 of 15 on Day 1 of the Warren Washington Symposium on Climate Modeling, Prediction, and Science Policy. Washington interweaves his own development as a scientist and the development of climate modeling. He then turns to science policy and its importance in the face of climate change.
Coleen Vogel (University of the Witwatersrand) Jul. 31, 2007
Whither Sustainability Science - A View from the South
(66 minutes)
A look at climate change implications for Africa, especially the south, including an examination of some of the inputs to the 2007 IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. Vogel provides an update on the International Human Dimensions Programme (IHDP) and the links and/or disconnections between currently developing research foci. Part of the seminar series on the Frontiers of Human Dimensions Science Research. | Abstract
Chris Mooney Jul. 24, 2007
Storm World: Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle over Global Warming
(40 minutes)
The author of Storm World discusses the ongoing debate over whether global warming is contributing to more frequent and more intense hurricanes.
Fredrick Semazzi (North Carolina State University) Jun. 27, 2007
A Multi-Scale Investigation of Climate Variability over Africa
(55 minutes)
An overview of African climate research at NC State's Climate Modeling Laboratory, including the collaborative UCAR Africa Initiative. A key focus is eastern Africa and hydroelectric power.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Jun. 21, 2007
Scientists Close in on Missing Carbon Sink; Northern Forests Less Effective than Expected - Multimedia Gallery
(video, illustration, photo)
Forests in the United States and other northern mid- and upper-latitude regions are playing a smaller role in offsetting global warming than previously thought. | News Release
William Clark (Harvard University) Jun. 19, 2007
Global Environmental Assessments: What have we learned from the first 30 years?
(1 hour, 11 minutes)
A comparative analysis of over 40 global environmental assessments asking under what conditions these assessments influence political and economic decision makers. Part of the seminar series on the Frontiers of Human Dimensions Science Research. | Abstract
NCAR & UCAR News Center Apr. 30, 2007
Arctic Ice Retreating More Quickly than Computer Models Project - Multimedia Gallery
(animations, illustrations)
Arctic sea ice is melting at a significantly faster rate than projected by even the most advanced computer models, a new study concludes. The research, by scientists at NCAR and the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center, shows that the Arctic's ice cover is retreating more rapidly than estimated by any of the 18 computer models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in preparing its 2007 assessments. | News Release
Diana Liverman (Oxford University Centre for the Environment) Apr. 24, 2007
Carbon Finance, Adaptation, and Climate Science: How should research respond to the climate regime?
(1 hour 4 minutes)
Discussion of Human Dimensions and Climate Science; mitigation (carbon prices, carbon offsets, non station state actors, carbon labels); and adaptation (UKCIP, development). Part of the seminar series on the Frontiers of Human Dimensions Science Research.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Apr. 18, 2007
Scientists to Track Impact of Asian Dust and Pollution on Clouds, Weather, Climate Change - Multimedia Gallery
(videos, illustrations, photos)
Using the nation's newest and most capable aircraft for environmental research, scientists have launched PACDEX, a far-reaching field project to study plumes of airborne dust and pollutants that originate in Asia and journey to North America. | News Release
Philip Rasch (CGD) Apr. 17, 2007
Geo-Engineering Climate Change with Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols
(49 minutes)
Rasch discusses the impact of injecting a precursor of sulfate aerosol into the middle atmosphere, where it would act to increase the planetary albedo and thus counter some of the effects of greenhouse gas forcing.
Tim Wirth (United Nations Foundation and Better World Fund) Apr. 13, 2007
Global Climate Change: From Challenge to Opportunity
(49 minutes)
Former Senator Tim Wirth focuses on the urgency of responding to climate change and offers strategies for fostering change at all levels. Wirth gave the 2007 Walter Orr Roberts Distinguished Lecture.
Roger Kasperson (Clark University) Mar. 13, 2007
Vulnerability Analysis
(1 hour, 9 minutes)
Environmental impact assessment; risk assessment; strategic environmental assessment; vulnerability assessment
Heinz Wanner (University of Bern) Feb. 23, 2007
Halocene Climate Swings - Real or Imaginary
(53 minutes)
Discussion of Millennial scale (two patterns) and Decadal to centennial scale: Globally visible cycles?
NCAR & UCAR News Center Feb. 15, 2007
Understanding Climate Change - Multimedia Gallery
(videos, animations, interactive illustrations, photos)
The year 2007 was significant for scientists, policymakers, and citizens investigating climate change and its impact on our planet's future. That year marked the release of a major report produced through global cooperation, the free exchange of ideas, and thorough scientific investigation. This multimedia gallery supports discussion of the report and current climate research. | News Feature
Caspar Ammann (CGD), Bill Collins (CGD), Mickey Glantz (CCB), Joanie Kleypas (ISSE), Linda Mearns (ISSE), Jerry Meehl (CGD), Kevin Trenberth (CGD), Warren Washington (CGD), Tom Wigley (CGD) Feb. 01, 2007
Climate Future: Voices of Science
(24 minutes, Flash)
Some of NCAR's most prominent scientists weigh in on key questions about climate change in these short interviews, produced by NCAR Education and Outreach.
NCAR & UCAR News Center Dec. 11, 2006
Innovative Satellite System Proves Its Worth with Better Weather Forecasts, Climate Data - Multimedia Gallery
(videos, illustrations, photos)
A set of six microsatellites, launched in April 2006, is probing the atmosphere in ways that have been impossible with previous observing systems. COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) can boost the accuracy of forecasts of hurricane behavior, significantly improve long-range weather forecasts, and monitor climate change with unprecedented accuracy. | News Release
Joe Tribbia (CGD) Dec. 06, 2006
Uncertainty Quantification, Predictability and Stochastic Parameterization
(59 minutes)
Joe Tribbia describes some recent efforts aimed at moving beyond the historical focus in parameterization, the mean tendency due to the convergence of rectified unresolved fluxes and examine the need for a broader approach based on scaling.
Brian Toon (University of Colorado) Oct. 10, 2006
Small Nuclear Wars - Nuclear Winter Revisited
(1 hour)
Based on the Papers: Consequences of Regional Scale Nuclear Conflicts and Acts of Individual Nuclear Terrorism and Climatic Consequences of Regional Scale Nuclear Conflicts
John Ogren (NOAA) Oct. 25, 2005
Observations of the Climate Forcing Properties of Aerosols
(45 minutes)
The presenter discusses NOAA's long-term measurement program for observing the climate forcing properties of aerosols. He focuses on direct radiative forcing.
Jim White (University of Colorado), Caspar Ammann (CGD), Dave Schimel (CGD), Jack Fox (EOL), Dirk Richter (EOL) Jun. 01, 2005
The Biocomplexity Project - Video Interviews
(45 brief Q&A segments, various times)
Scientists answer questions about climate change and the Biocomplexity Project, which is developing a mid-infrared, laser-based gas sensor system for continuous insitu measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 ratios. The project exploits the latest developments in optical fiber technology and telecommunication lasers. | Home Page
Jim Randerson (University of California, Irvine) Feb. 18, 2005
Consequences of a Changing Boreal Fire Regime for Climate and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide
(82 minutes)
The presenter explores causes of interannual variability in the global carbon cycle. He describes an approach to isolate the fire contribution to the signal at the global scale and outlines the effects of fire in the boreal zone on the surface energy budget.
Kathleen Miller (ISSE) Feb. 16, 2005
Climate Variability and Multinational Marine Fisheries
(58 minutes)
Will better information promote sustainability in marine fisheries that are shared between two or more nations? Topics include climate impacts and game theory insights. Guidelines are proposed for cooperative management. | Abstract
Gerald A. Meehl (CGD) Jan. 19, 2005
The IPCC Assessment Report: Process, Status, and Early Results
(52 minutes)
The presenter, a coordinating lead author in Working Group I (climate science) of the Fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, discusses the procedures, status, and sample results of the working group. | Abstract
Kevin E. Trenberth (CGD) Dec. 07, 2004
Monitoring and Prediction of the Earth's Climate: A Future Perspective
(56 minutes)
This talk is based on a presentation given at the CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability) 2004 conference. The aims and goals of the World Climate Research Programme's new program, COPES (Coordinated Observation an Prediction of the Earth System), are summarized. | Abstract
 
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