UCAR Communications
News Releases

BAMEX Visuals

Contact:

David Hosansky
UCAR Communications
Telephone: (303) 497-8611
E-mail: hosansky@ucar.edu

Keli Tarp, NOAA National
Severe Storms Laboratory
Telephone:405-366-0451
E-mail: Keli.Tarp@noaa.gov

Cheryl Dybas
National Science Foundation
Telephone:703-292-7734
E-mail: cdybas@nsf.gov


Bow Echo and MCV Experiment (BAMEX) home page
BAMEX news release (May 5, 2003)
BAMEX media advisory (May 12, 2003)

The visuals below may be used free of charge with the accompanying captions and credits.


BAMEX slide show

To download the high-resolution TIF version of an image in the slide show, please go to our BAMEX FTP site and find the corresponding file name (e.g., "bamex19.tif" for the high-res version of "bamex19.jpg").

BAMEX study area
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Caption: The weather may be sampled anywhere in the BAMEX study area (red hatched border) as the project unfolds. Three aircraft will traverse the area within a 500-mile radius of St. Louis (purple circle).
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

Front edge of mesoscale convective system
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Caption: This menacing cloud was part of a mesoscale convective system studied in a previous Montana field project. Such systems, dominated by strong, outflowing winds and heavy rain, are the focus of the Bow Echo and MCV Experiment, slated from May 19 to July 6 across the Midwest.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

Bow echo on radar
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Caption: This Doppler radar image collected by the National Weather Service on the evening of June 11, 2001, shows a strong bow echo moving southeast across Wisconsin.
Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Wind damage in Kansas
Sizes: Small JPG (above)
TIF (1600x1200)
Caption: A pair of silos in western Kansas was half-flattened on 27 May 2001 by a derecho--a long, intense swath of destructive wind produced by a mesoscale convective system. This derecho extended from northwest Kansas into north Texas, producing over 170 reports of high wind over 12 hours. Derechoes typically produce a bow echo on radar.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

MIPS at a field project in Oklahoma
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Caption: Deployed on weather research projects across the country, The Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS), from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), includes a Doppler wind profiler (upward-pointing radar that senses precipitation and winds aloft), a Doppler sodar (sonic-based radar that senses wind direction and speed aloft), a lidar ceilometer (upward-pointing, laser-based radar that detects cloud height and airborne particles), and a microwave profiling radiometer (a device that senses microwave radiation and infers temperature, moisture and cloud water at various heights), along with other equipment.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

MIPS payload
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Caption: The payload of the Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS), from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), includes a Doppler wind profiler (upward-pointing radar that senses precipitation and winds aloft), a Doppler sodar (sonic-based radar that senses wind direction and speed aloft), a lidar ceilometer (upward-pointing, laser-based radar that detects cloud height and airborne particles), and a microwave profiling radiometer (a device that senses microwave radiation and infers temperature, moisture and cloud water at various heights), along with other equipment.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

Technicians at work on MIPS in Oklahoma
Sizes: Small JPG (above)
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Caption: Staff from the University of Alabama in Huntsville work on the Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) during a deployment in the Oklahoma Panhandle.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

MGLASS launch preparations
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Caption: NCAR's Ned Chamberlain prepares a radiosonde package from the Mobile GLASS van (top left). The Mobile GLASS (GPS/Loran Atmospheric Sounding System) includes equipment to conduct upper-air measurements and supporting surface observations. The system has everything required for a successful radiosonde launch.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

MGLASS launch
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Caption: NCAR's Ned Chamberlain readies an MGLASS balloon for launch. The Mobile GLASS (GPS/Loran Atmospheric Sounding System) includes equipment to conduct upper-air measurements and supporting surface observations. The system has everything required for a successful radiosonde launch.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

NRL P-3 from front
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Caption: This Lockheed P-3 aircraft, operated by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is currently home to the ELDORA (ELectra DOppler RAdar), an airborne research Doppler radar. Its two antennas extend back from the tail and spin about the long axis of the aircraft, with one pointing slightly ahead and one slightly behind. With the aircraft in flight, ELDORA traces two conical helixes through the atmosphere, essentially observing all of the atmosphere within 3060 miles (50100 kilometers). The data along each helix yield the wind speed in two dimensions. Together the two scans provide a three-dimensional picture of air motion.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

NRL P-3 with ELDORA from back
Sizes: Small JPG (above)
Larger JPG (1596x746)
Caption: ELDORA (ELectra DOppler RAdar) is an airborne research Doppler radar currently installed in the tail section (far left) of a Lockheed P-3 aircraft operated by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Its two antennas extend back from the tail and spin about the long axis of the aircraft, with one pointing slightly ahead and one slightly behind. With the aircraft in flight, ELDORA traces two conical helixes through the atmosphere, essentially observing all of the atmosphere within 30 to 60 miles (50 to 100 kilometers). The data along each helix yield the wind speed in two dimensions. Together the two scans provide a three-dimensional picture of air motion.
Credit: NCAR/UCAR/NSF

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UCAR > Communications > News Releases > 2003 Search

Prepared for the web by Carlye Calvin
Last revised: Tuesday, May 6, 2003 3:54 PM