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1997-17 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 14, 1997

Winners of the 1997 Colorado Computational Science Fair

Contact: David Hosansky
UCAR Communications
P.O. Box 3000
Boulder, CO 80307-3000
Telephone: (303) 497-8611
Fax: (303) 497-8610
E-mail: hosansky@ucar.edu

May 14, 1997
BOULDER--William J. Palmer High School in Colorado Springs, George Washington High School in Denver, Horizon High School in Brighton, Wheat Ridge High School in Wheat Ridge, and Cheraw High School in Cheraw took first-place prizes at the Colorado Computational Science Fair May 10 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder. Other schools around the state also won awards at the fair, which was cohosted by Colorado State University and NCAR.

Each of the 40 projects submitted for judging fell into one of two areas: computational science, where students use computers to solve science problems, or information technology, such as applications for the World Wide Web. The computational science category was further divided into three levels: students enrolled in Algebra I were in Level One; students who had completed Algebra I but had not taken calculus were in Level Two; and students enrolled in calculus or beyond were in Level Three. The 70 participating students represented ten Colorado high schools. Colorado laboratories, computer industries, and universities provided the 13 judges.

Two of the first-place project winners will participate in Adventures in Supercomputing: AiS 1997 National Exposition in Washington, D.C., June 22-24. They are: "Orbital Stability in Relation to Fractal Dimension" by Twila Paterson from William J. Palmer High School in Colorado Springs, and "Is the Relationship between Cheetahs and Gazelles a Symbiotic One?" by Tessa Pope and Aba Arthur-Asmah, both from George Washington High School in Denver. Winners are listed below under each category.

Computational Science: Level One Individual Projects

First place: Encoding and Decoding. Mike Maurer, Cheraw High School, Cheraw. Teacher: Tom Hibbs.

Second place: Test Scoring and Record Editing. Benjamin Coakley, Cheraw High School, Cheraw. Teacher: Tom Hibbs.

Computational Science: Level Two Group Projects

First place: Circuit Simulator. Logan Mattox, Greg Forsha, Wheat Ridge High School, Wheat Ridge. Teacher: Charles Powell.

Second place (tie): Bridge Building: Not Just for Trolls. Jessica Kafer, Nathan Van Vorst, Wheat Ridge High School, Wheat Ridge. Teacher: Charles Powell.

Second place (tie): The Effect of Altitude on Baseball Flight. Tom Dechand, Dan Mastbergen, Rocky Mountain High School, Fort Collins. Teacher: Debbie Waterloo.

Honorable mention: Cochlear Implant (soundwave). Ody Pol, Kimberley Garcia, Denver West High School, Denver. Teacher: Rita Schnittgrund.

Honorable mention: Square to Knights Tour. Albert Boyd, Douglas Clow, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Computational Science: Level Two Individual Projects

First place: Orbital Stability in Relation to Fractal Dimension. Twila Paterson, William J. Palmer High School, Colorado Springs. Teacher: Rata Clarke.

Second place: Fuzzy Logic: Artificial Neural Networks and Ambiguous Reduced Training Sets Inducing Fuzzy Behavior. Adam Bolt, William J. Palmer High School, Colorado Springs. Teacher: Rata Clarke.

Third place: Encryption and Decryption. Jared Eikenberg, Cheraw High School, Cheraw. Teacher: Tom Hibbs.

Computational Science: Level Three Group Projects

First place: Is the Relationship between Cheetahs and Gazelles a Symbiotic One? Tessa Pope, Aba Arthur-Asmah, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Second place: Flight by the Seat of the Earth--An Aircraft Simulation. Michael Trowbridge, David Shinefeld, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Third place: Glaciers: Changing the World as We Know It. Shelley Smith, Huma Babak, Carlota Lin, Rocky Mountain High School, Fort Collins. Teacher: Debbie Waterloo.

Computational Science Level Three Individual Projects

First place (tie): Waveform Image Compression. Kennet Belenky, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

First place (tie): The Use of Quadratic Splines in Ray-Trace Animation. Kennet Belenky, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

First place (tie): Steganowhat? Kennet Belenky, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Third place: Light. Aaron Horiuchi, Horizon High School, Brighton. Teacher: Matt Puccio.

Information Technology Group Projects

First place: Horizon's Homepage. Jason Wilson, Travis Law, Dan Williams, Jason Ragsdale, Brian Collins, Jake Goszdak, Felix Dierich, Brian Belnap, Horizon High School, Brighton. Teacher: Matt Puccio.

Second place: George Mud. Liam Brucker, Brandon Peterson, Cory Buchholz, Wellington Yau, Joey Mendoza, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Third place: A Technological Look at Hurricanes. Russell Deffner, Nick Clarkson, Platte Canyon High School, Bailey. Teacher: Marjorie Ader.

Honorable mention: Science and Current Events on the Web. Christian Enriquez, Victor Leal, Denver North High School, Denver. Teacher: George Moreno.

Information Technology Individual Projects

First place (tie): Virtual Maze with CGI on WWW. Felix Dierich, Horizon High School, Brighton. Teacher: Ray Meester.

First place (tie): My Website. Felix Dierich, Horizon High School, Brighton. Teacher: Ray Meester

Second place: GeorgeWeb. Kennet Belenky, George Washington High School, Denver. Teacher: Ted Brucker.

Third place: Colorado Avalanche Homepage. Brenda Clark, Horizon High School, Brighton. Teacher: Ray Meester.

Check the World Wide Web for more information on the 1997 Colorado Computational Science Fair. NCAR is managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research under sponsorship by the National Science Foundation.

-The End-

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